Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Sproingg

A most appreciative hello and welcome back to The Closet Concert Arena fellow progheads!  The carousel we call 2019 is moving so fast I can't believe I haven't fallen off--or at least gotten dizzy!  As usual the Concert Closet logged serious frequent flyer miles this week as the search for all things prog went all the way to Germany to check in with yet one more new member of the prog garden, Sproingg, and their self-titled debut release.




Sproingg is best described as polyrythmic prog chaos...something from every corner of the prog garden.  First listen through takes me on a journey across strange terrain; classical, jazz, metal,
avant-garde, and a bit of funk.

The opening cut, "Sugarwax Nailface," starts off seemingly as an improv piece; everyone checking the others' vibe--and then a groove catches fire.  Almost like an undisciplined King Crimson with top notes of Happy Graveyard Orchestra and Dreadnaught, the music comes at you from several directions, bouncing through your cerebrum like  a pinball.

Moving a bit farther along I discover "Homunculous Funkulous."  A percussion opening that really needs to be heard to be appreciated, this piece has hints of Flim & The BB's roaming around flirting with the Violent Femmes.  Sproingg is a band that likes to have fun while reminding you they are serious  musicians.  The simplicity and nakedness adds a level of intrigue to their sound; I imagine a stage with three lights and a broom standing in the corner while the audience hangs on every note being played.  Sproingg opens their songs with a spotlight on one member and then methodically brings the rest of the band in...like folding cheese into a sauce; the sum is so much better than the parts...

Liner Notes...originating in Freiberg Germany, Sproingg is Prudi Bruschgo on guitars, Johannes Korn on Chapman Stick and electric violin, and Erik Feder on drums and percussion.  I imagine Sproingg being the German equivalent of an American garage band much like The Foo Fighters.  Not in the way they sound--but in their approach to making music.  I would also compare them to Scarlet INside in that sound can come from anywhere and be made with (almost) anything...Jamie Muir was a driving force in this arena many moons ago...

Although Sproingg  occupies territory in the polyrhythmic/syncopated rock section of the prog garden--a section that is not overpopulated at the moment--they stand even farther off center because their sound is performance based...which gives it (to me) a bit more credibility.  The recorded music is a snapshot of their playing at that moment; the live shows are a constant interpretation of their own sound...

Next up for dissection is "The Aliens Have Landed And I'm One Of Them."  This was a song written for improvisation if I've ever heard one.  The opening percussion work hearkens of Thank You Scientist as it escorts you down a path that is equal parts eerie and giddy.  The guitar floats in slowly surrounded by a chorus of other-worldly images that capture the imagination and keep you on the edge of your seat.  Top notes of Ozric Tentacles and Thrak-era King Crimson are filling my headphones at the moment; excuse me while I sit back and savor the moment...

Take in the full Sproingg experience at their  Facebook page and purchase the music at Sproingg.

This week I bring you a taste from the well; "No Place For Children" and "Krummfutter."  Sproingg  falls into a subgenre of prog I like to call minimalist because they do a lot with so little.  Three musicians are behind the curtain here and the imagery is quite vivid.  The sound rolls down the inside of your auditory sensors like warm fudge...slow and steady as you begin to realize how wonderful it all really is.  As one song bleeds into the next I get a Can meets The League of Gentlemen vibe; just dim the lights and let it wash over you...


                   

So my fellow progheads I hope you enjoyed this week's installment.  On the one hand Sproingg is not your dad's prog band--but on the other hand they absolutely spot on are.  As new bands continue to emerge in the prog garden it is refreshing to know they can draw on the standard bearers without being carbon copies.  Hell; Sproingg can't produce an exact replica of their own sound let alone someone else's.  And therein lies the beauty of prog; the ability to grow your own sound and style continually and not be boxed in.

This was a fun week for me but as always, all good things lead to other good things.  So time for the Concert Closet to take the search for all things prog onward yet again.  Until next time...

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

The Emerald Dawn "Nocturne"

Welcome back to The Closet Concert Arena fellow progheads!  Now that we are in full spring mode the search for all things prog is taking on a travel mindset.  This week the journey takes me back to the UK to check in with The Emerald Dawn and their latest release, "Nocturne."  This is album number three for the group, a symphonic prog band that blends classical, jazz, rock, and just a hint of metal to produce something quite unique in their section of the prog garden.


Dropping laser to disc, my first taste of this buffet is a song called "As Darkness Falls."  The headphones are immediately filled with a heavy brooding as the canvas is streaked with dark hues.  The Emerald Dawn is lavish like Dream Theater, eloquent like Gentle Giant, and multi-faceted like The Strawbs.  Their sound washes over you like high tide at a surf competition; knocking you down one minute and lifting you back up the next.  The intensity of the keyboards on this cut is much like stumbling across a bear while out hiking; the immediate adrenaline rush carries you away until things settle a bit and you allow the experience to replay inside your mind.

A haunting piano opens "Moonlight," the second course served up here.  The Emerald Dawn has a way of getting  not just under, but inside your skin and permeating your entire body.  The music begins by waltzing across my mind and slowly running down the inside of my neck, ultimately carrying to every part of my being.  The guitar picks up and rides a wave with the drums...and I am mesmerized.

Liner Notes...although originally formed in Edinburgh,Scotland, The Emerald Dawn has since taken up residence in St. Ives Cornwall in the southwest of England.  The band consists of Tree Stewart on keyboards, flute, acoustic guitar, and vocals; Ally Carter on electric and acoustic guitar, guitar synthesizer, tenor and soprano sax, keyboards, and vocals; David Greenaway on fretless and fretted bass guitar; and Tom Jackson on drums and percussion. 

The Emerald Dawn can be as ornate as ELP but without the flash and fanfare; they simply build a multi-layered sound that needs to be listened to so as to be fully appreciated.  Releasing their debut album in 2014 and a follow up in 2017, The Emerald Dawn is now three albums deep into their journey across the prog garden, one that should prove quite fruitful based on the bounty thus far. Their quest to create symphonic prog takes them across dark and somewhat rough terrain, but the landscape is what gives the music its character and credibility.  Notice the canvas streaked with ambient to dark hues...dripping down like so much mist in the night forest...

Learn more about The Emerald Dawn and purchase their music at The Emerald Dawn.  You can purchase "Nocturne" as well as their two previous albums and find out more about the band.  There is also Facebook for the modern day groupie as well as Twitter @TheEmeraldDawn1.  You will also find the band at bandcamp if you prefer to purchase downloads there.  The options are plentiful and its been awhile since I preached, but please support the artists!

One more slice of dark tranquility, "The Child Within."  This is a stunning work; just sit still and let it wash over you a few times.  The song opens with all the hoopla of a David Lynch movie; anticipation building on intensity.  There are top notes of Genesis and Uriah Heep floating through the room and Tree's vocals are reminiscent of Nico when she recorded with The Velvet Underground.  This is the cut that puts the "progressive" in progressive rock for The Emerald Dawn; there is so much happening on the periphery you almost get swallowed by the enormity of the production...and there's no shame in that.

And here is the point where I usually post a song to tempt you to open your wallet as well as your auditory sensors, but no ear candy this week.  You'll have to buy the album to get the music and you really should.  The Emerald Dawn has put together a beautiful record; "Nocturne" is a stroll through the symphonic section of the prog garden and the imagery is striking.


This album takes me back to when progressive rock was filled with "those bands," groups that paid attention with their hearts and souls; writing, performing, and producing music they believed in and letting the listener decide.  So many musicians today seem like they signed up for a job--not these folks.  The Emerald Dawn is in it for the long haul which is perfectly fine by me...The Closet Concert Arena always has time (and space) for another stellar performance!

Of course that can only mean one thing; time to take the search for all things prog back on the road...until next time... 

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

The Steve Bonino Project "Stargazer 2"

Springtime greetings fellow progheads!  Hard to believe the search for all things prog has crossed over the threshold into the spring equinox--2019 continues to sail on!  Now that the tundra is not quite so frozen I am finding a lot of great new growth in the prog garden.  This week's journey led me to a musician who has connections with many other members of the prog world--but in and of itself that is not so unusual.  The prog umbrella has expanded over the years while the prog community remains a tight knit one...

Steve Bonino is a multi-talented multi-instrumentalist who released his latest album, "Stargazer 2"  under the guise of The Steve Bonino Project.  A concept album dealing with a dystopian future where man has failed to care for the planet to the point Earth is no longer inhabitable, "Stargazer 2"  is a bit dark perhaps, but when the curtain is pulled back one never knows what lies on the far side, so hand me that rope, would you?



The album opens appropriately enough with "The Grand Finale."  Beautiful piano interlude leads you down an alley of uncertainty; the tempo is akin to running in the dark as you dart under spotlights  catching you stop-motion like.  The song moves quickly and despite opening on the gloomy side of town it manages to cross over to a brightly lit boulevard, careening through a world of mayhem...or is it just a dream?

The next song to pour through the headphones is "City Out Of Time."  We begin to look into the eyes of despair with this cut as clouds continue to roll in blocking out the light.  You feel a sense of relief as guitars begin to penetrate the haze and drums resonate around the room, but then the darkness begins to swallow you again...

Liner Notes...a native New Yorker currently based in sunny California,  Steve Bonino is the driving force behind The Steve Bonino Project, although the album was produced with some very accomplished, well known musicians joining in to add their talents to specific cuts.  The who's who runs deep; Peter Matuchniak  and Erik Johnson on guitars, Seth Lewis on backing vocals, and a drum corps that includes Mike Lewis, Jimmy Keegan, and Marco Minnemann.  I would say a few valedictorians in that class.  Heading out on the road Steve is keeping Peter and Jimmy on the team while adding Jonathan Sindelman, Mike Keneally, and Seth Romano.  Another stellar group with lots of A-List experience; this tour should be on your summer "must-see" list.

Another choice morsel spinning around the turntable is a song called "Broken Record" with a  melancholy opening that flirts with your moral compass.  Top notes of a 10cc/Gentle Giant  melange, the tune emits shards of light--hope--on the dystopian world we turned Mother Earth into while at the same time lamenting the continued shortcomings of even the best intentions; life is a broken record indeed...

Steve has been around the prog garden a few times.  Fans will remember he was part of the 2018 breakout band Bomber Goggles and their debut release, "Gyreland."  Steve has done extensive solo work, performed with many artists, and was involved with several groups having roots that run deep through the prog garden.  You can learn more about Steve and his pedigree at Steve Bonino.  There you will find links to this album and all of his music.  You will also find Steve on Facebook and Twitter @trippyone.

The listening portion of the blog this week is the final cut, "Fear."  Just as everything seems to be fading from sight this tune opens at high anxiety level; you're being trailed by an unknown evil you know is there but can't see.  The strings start to pull at your nerves while they seep into your consciousness..and the tension builds steadily.  The Steve Bonino Project comes full circle on the concept with this cut; the idea that man as a species mucks up everything he touches only to attempt half-hearted justification for all the wrongdoing.  The question of what to do next is always open-ended and while the song breaks through the veil in your mind separating logic from emotion, it leaves you with a sense of uncertainty--and isn't that the point?


                      

I enjoyed this album as much for the music as I did for the introspective lens it offers the listener to view it through.  Entertainment is the main goal of listening to music, but the beauty of prog is that it goes a step (or two) further.  Many of the standard bearers--and up and comers of today--make you think.  This album does both, entertaining you while urging you to use your cranium.  I put The Steve Bonino Project on a par with Seconds Before Landing, Scarlet INside, and Servants of Science for their ability to tap into the listener's cerebrum...

I hope this week's stroll through the prog garden did as much to relax and entertain you as it did to enlighten and excite you.  The Steve Bonino Project for me is a prog band that takes you on a journey and explains the sights along the way.  Speaking of which, the search for all things prog makes another stop on the journey soon...until next time...

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

The Inner Road "The Majestic Garden"

Welcome once again fellow progheads!  Hopefully your mind and spirit kept up with the clock as we leaped ahead into daylight savings time.  Don't worry if you're sixty minutes behind when arriving at The Closet Concert Arena this week--there is always room for one more!  The search for all things prog is a bit special for me this time around as the journey takes me back once again to the UK to check in with a friend I met by way of this blog...

The Inner Road is but one project spearheaded by Steve Gresswell and "The Majestic Garden" is the band's fourth release; two years in the making and released just two weeks ago.  The Inner Road tends to fill the halls of the Concert Closet with a rich full sound, so let's get right to it, shall we?

 Leading the way this week is the album's title cut and it opens with quite a ruckus...as is the trail Steve usually traverses.  Keyboards take center stage as the headphones erupt with a cacophony of boisterous sound.  Extremely upbeat, the canvas is streaked with bright colors akin to a confetti cannon on New Year's Eve.  The Inner Road travels around the prog garden yet tends to call the symphonic section home.  There are aromatics of Emerson, Lake & Palmer wafting in the air along with a splash of Camel.  

Moving a bit further down the play list I find another attention grabber, "Fire of Life."  As the song opens you feel as though a tremendous church choir is about to erupt all around and then suddenly...Trans Siberian Orchestra is bouncing off the walls of your mind.  This is an extremely exciting piece of music that explodes all over the canvas.  Steve is once again wreaking havoc with the keyboards but it's all good...oh yes!  The frenetic pace continues as the music rains down like a summer fireworks display...

Liner Notes...This latest incarnation of Inner Road is founder Steve Gresswell who serves as producer, songwriter, and keyboard player accompanied by Carl Anthony Wright on guitar.  Steve has worked with many stellar musicians during his career and Carl raises the bar with his work here.  As a frequent visitor to the prog garden with Coalition as well as The Inner Road, Steve has tilled a lot of acreage in many sections but the ornate, full-bodied sound emanating from the symphonic corner seems to be his wheelhouse.  Spend some time under your headphones and you will agree I'm sure...

The third course this week is a song called "Water Well."  This piece is a beautiful melange of keyboards and guitars as Steve and Carl feed off each other's energy.  The canvas is streaked with explosions of bright primary colors as a kaleidoscope spins in my head; there are top notes of Transatlantic and Spock's Beard wandering the halls of my mind.  Steve pushes the keys to a fever pitch and Carl is only too happy to accept the challenge as he lays the guitar bare.  Hot fun in the winter time...

Learn more about The Inner Road and find all their music at their Bandcamp site The Inner Road.  There is also Facebook and Twitter @innerroad  for those looking for a peak behind the curtain.

My musical teaser for you this week is another earful, "Mother Earth."  Steve and Carl shine as bright as the sun bouncing off a rear view mirror on this cut.  The music cascades all around the inner lining of your skull, leaving a brightly colored trail of sparks.  The Inner Road has put together a high energy album much like hot sauce for the mind...just don't use it sparingly...

                       

Once again time has slipped away as easily as snow melting in the sun.  Traveling The Inner Road with Steve and Carl made for a high octane week that coincides perfectly with Mother Nature's roll out of spring in a few days.  As the soil in the prog garden begins to thaw, I anxiously await the new crop of prog music headed for the Concert Closet.  The Inner Road has opened the door for the next leg of the journey; only time will tell where the search for all things prog will lead us restless listeners.  Until next time... 

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Kinetic Element "The Face of Life"

Greetings from the tundra fellow progheads!  Regardless of where you call home, the groundhog fooled us all this year.  Fortunately the Concert Closet is heated and quite comfortable...and currently following a GPS guided search for all things prog across these United States...

Being always on the lookout for the next big thing, I discovered the new release from Kinetic Element, "The Face of Life." This album literally just hit the streets and I am excited to give it a listen.  While the roots of the band are in the cozy hills of Virginia, their guitarist laid his tracks down from sunny California (more on that later).  So join me as we partake of the latest from this neo/symphonic prog rock band...


Dropping the laser on the start of the disc leads me right into "Epistle." The song opens so quickly you feel like you missed the first two minutes; the symphonic aspects come right at you.  There are top notes of Yes and Genesis roaming freely through the entire cut as guitar work provides a perfect platform from which the vocals leap into the headphones, permeate the veil, and reverberate through your head.  It would be easy to say Kinetic Element paints the canvas with loud colorful strokes--but would it be totally accurate?  This is a band that cuts a wide swath across the prog garden every time out.  Let this one pour down on you like a sudden rain storm in July...
 
Moving the laser farther along the CD I discover "All Open Eyes" and once again Kinetic Element bursts through the gate with gusto.  Keyboards and guitars lead you down a brightly lit path toward musical bliss.  There are aromatics of Gentle Giant and Camel wafting across the room and swirling about your cranium, the music a siren luring you across the prog garden.

Much like the Genesis masterpiece " Supper's Ready," this song goes through time, tempo, and mood changes the way Pete Townsend goes through guitars.  Kinetic Element shows off their ability to be ornate without being pretentious; the headphones burst with energy as the music flows through your entire being.

Liner Notes...Kinetic Element is based in Richmond VA and the line-up on this album is Saint John Coleman on vocals, Mike Visaggio on piano, organ, and synthesizers, Pete Matuchniak on guitars, Mark Tupko on bass, and Michael Murray on drums.  Pete, no stranger to the Concert Closet, laid his guitar tracks down from the the warm confines of Irvine CA, hence the need to travel coast-to-coast for this leg of the journey.  Mr. Matuchniak has traveled many a lap around the prog garden; Kinetic Element is a fine feather in a well worn cap...

Kinetic Element came into existence in 2006 to perform Mike Visaggio's solo work "Starship Universe" at the Pop Montreal festival that year.  The band signed to Melodic Revolution Records in 2013 and continued their upward trajectory.  Many miles, festivals, headliners, and a few line-up changes since that time led to "The Face of Light," the third album in their catalog.

My last choice for review from what truly is a tantalizing music buffet is "Last Words."  A softer opening than previous, this song floats gently across your auditory sensors and wraps itself around your soul. Vocals and keyboards take center stage on this cut, flowing as smoothly as melted chocolate down the side of a New York cheesecake.  There is an Asia/Yes vibe here as I sense Mike alternately channeling Rick Wakeman and Geoff Downes while pouring his all into those ivories...

Learn more about Kinetic Element at their website Kinetic Element.  You will find links there to purchase this album and all the band's music.  You can also wander behind the curtain at their
Facebook page and Twitter @kineticelement.



I chose "The Face of Life" as your weekly teaser for two reasons.  First, I am always intrigued by title cuts; they usually convey the main focus or message the album is attempting to convey. Second, it's just a beautiful piece of music.  Everyone gets to "strut their stuff" on this song as Kinetic Element waltzes across the prog garden with heads held high, and justifiably so.  The band's ability to channel early Genesis once again shines through as time changes, mood swings, and a liquid tempo will leave you wanting more--even after nineteen minutes plus!  I pick up aromatics of The Strawbs and Gentle Giant simmering under the surface as well.  There is so much here but nothing makes you feel overwhelmed; just sated.  Taking a journey across one's life should be this complex and yet this simple.  "The Face of Life" will remind you of why you got into prog in the first place...

                   

And just like that the flame is extinguished as the candle burns down...melted wax pooling in your mind as the music fades.  Kinetic Element is a band that is very comfortable wearing the symphonic prog moniker--and they wear it well.  To be able to come across as ornate without drowning themselves out, all the while packing so much strength and emotion into five songs that carry you away for about sixty minutes of utopia...just another reason to stay in the prog garden a good long time, thank you very much...

Never forget what brought you here and keeps you coming back...the search for all things prog can be a wondrous journey indeed...until next time...

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Residuos Mentales "Introspection"

Greetings from the Closet Concert Arena fellow progheads!  I hope you are enjoying the bountiful  crop the prog garden has graced 2019 with thus far--of course we've only begun this leg of the journey!  This week I felt a desire for something a bit different; nothing way off the radar screen yet something that puts a bit of a twist on what the headphones have been cranking out lately...in other words, it's time to expand the parameters of the prog garden...

My quest for something new meant setting the GPS for the unknown...which took the search for all things prog to Greece this week, a place I have not visited nearly enough.  They say curiosity killed the cat; I say the cat should have been a prog fan; he would have had a much happier life!  Welcome to the sounds of Residuos Mentales.


The opening cut, "Pandora's Box," peels the curtain back with some terrestrial sounds led by a definitive piano...there is a Jordan Rudess meets sci-fi meets The Moody Blues feel to the intro; if it's possible to be swept up in a cloud of music and transported to a different universe, this song takes you there.  A calming serenity flows gently through every note as well, much like watching the tide slowly roll in as the full moon illuminates the beach...

Farther down the playlist, "The Thorn in Me" continues the somber elegance that permeates the room.  There are top notes of Al DiMeola on soft acoustic as flute and piano once again rinse the stress away as easily as peeling off silk pajamas.  Residuos Mentales rides that fine line etched between the ambient and AOR sections of the prog garden.  Your pulse is slowed to a gentle whisper as you fall smoothly into the musical surreal...

Liner Notes...Residuos Mentales call Athens, Greece home.  The band is a two man operation consisting of Stratos Morianos on keyboards and Alexandros Mantas on guitars and flute.  "Introspection," their first foray into the prog garden, was released last August.  Starting out with a concept album is a bit of a risk, but Residuos Mentales manage to wade through those rough waters just fine.  Originally coming together in 2012, the duo spent the better part of four years recording a plethora of instrumental pieces that culminated in this 2018 debut.  Stratos and Alexandros seem to draw energy and emotion from each other as they put this album together song by song...connecting the darkness lurking behind a seemingly harmless facade to the inner workings of a tortured soul..."Introspection" tells of one man's internal anguish as he deals with memories of his past, hence the dark somber overtones and canvas filled with gray to black hues...


One last peek behind the mask reveals "A Prospect of a Blooming Life," another beautiful piece that shines a bit of light on the entire collection.  The piano once again basks in the spotlight but with more tender overtones and an acoustic counterpart that caresses your mind as it flows smoothly through the headphones and right through your entire being.  Residuos Mentales has taken up residence in a unique section of the prog garden; blending the beauty of original Greek music with a  "quiet ornate" flair and a touch of ambient, much the way Eno was a soothing balm in his earlier days.  The canvas is flush with bright colors more reminiscent of a summer's day than a Peter Max painting; soothing for the mind and spirit--not a jolt of caffeine.

Find out more about Residuos Mentales at the band's Facebook page.  There are several options for purchasing the music; bandcampiTunes, and Amazon are great places to start.  Residuos Mentales play with your senses; a concept album dealing with memories of a tortured past yet there seems to be more serenity than pain in the music...or are they just memories smoothed over with time?  "Introspection" toys with you repeatedly, challenging you to forget (or change?) your past.

The finale for the week is "A Promise Unkept/Mental Residuals."  A gentle reminder that perhaps  not everything follows even the best of plans...sometimes the mental roadblocks keep you from your chosen path.  Yet Residuos Mentales is able to paint  a broken spirit with a gentle brush as you find yourself looking inward with more peace of mind than regret.  Introspection can be a good thing...


                         

Once again we have come to the end of the road for this week fellow progheads; the sand has dropped into the bottom globe of the hourglass.  Residuos Mentales was a refreshing journey through new acreage in the prog garden, a gentle mind massage for those in need of mental relaxation.  To venture into one's past wary of the pain and torment yet able to find serenity in all the commotion is a rare thing; Stratos and Alexandros walked that path beautifully.  This week's journey was a pleasant side road filled with splendor...

The search for all things prog continues on the road less traveled...until next time...

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Falling Edge "FE3"

Welcome once again to The Closet Concert Arena fellow progheads!  Punxsutawney Phil lied; winter continues its cruel grasp on the globe--at least my section of it.  No worries though; we have ways of staying warm here on the tundra, mainly by pumping some good prog through the headphones and sitting by the fire with a warm beverage...yeah, that's more like it.

Now that we're all comfortable, let's check out what the search for all things prog led us to this week; a new release from Falling Edge, "FE3."  A return visitor to the Concert Closet that releases their music independently, Falling Edge is one of those bands that is hard to pigeon hole; they tend to wander the entire prog garden gathering ideas and inspiration, creating their own unique style.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

The opening cut "Where Should We Go From Here?" is a quick snippet of the adventure you are about to embark on.  The music starts off gently, leading you down a dark alley that awakens your inner fear sensors...and then the door opens to "Experience/Innocence" waiting on the other side, assuring you everything will be fine.  A soft acoustic opening leads you on a journey of self exploration.  Even with top notes of The StrawbsFalling Edge remains a band as determined to stand out among the masses as a John Petrucci guitar solo in church.  The piece continues to flow through you with delicate ease, keeping the emotional elevator on the ground floor while soothing guitar and gentle vocals reverb through your  body.

Next up is "Gone," a song that pushes away from the shore Falling Edge  has kept steadfastly close to thus far.  Don't worry--they don't take you through a metal minefield, but you will discover keyboards that splatter bright colors across the canvas and a guitar that hits you like a taser warning shot.  I sense aromatics of Hollow Moon and The Tangent wafting through the headphones as Falling Edge continues on their journey across the prog garden seeking ideas and opportunities to create their unique sound.
Liner Notes...Falling Edge hails from Chatham, Ontario and since I have reviewed them several times in the past, I will attempt to avoid redundancy and simply tell you Falling Edge is the brainchild of founder Chris Rupert.  "FE3" consists of Chris on vocals, guitar, bass, and keyboards, and Rob Kovar on drums.  Many a musician has their name on the Falling Edge alumni list; Chris brings together those he feels can best contribute to the music at hand.  

Since their debut in 2004 Falling Edge has released three albums,  each an independent slice of their unique style in the prog garden. Chris continues to push and challenge himself musically with each addition to the catalog, and "FE3" is one more step in Falling Edge's journey across the prog soundscape.  

Dig a bit deeper into the making of "FE3" and find out more about Falling Edge at their website 
Falling Edge.  You will find links there to purchase all of their music as well as news about the status of album number four.  You can also follow along on Facebook and Twitter @FallingEdgeband .

Last song for review, "Seventeen," is another cut that expands the parameters of the prog garden acreage Falling Edge tends with passion.  A hard-hitting guitar intro complements Rob's drum work nicely. This is an instrumental piece pumping through the headphones with the veracity of a newly discovered oil vein deep underground, bursting forth and soaking you completely.  Let this album flow through your mind awhile and allow yourself to pick up something new each time...
For your music fix this week I chose the earlier reviewed "Gone."  Get swept up in the exuberance of brightly colored keyboards that pave the way for harder hitting guitars and drums--then hang on as Chris comes at you with vocals reminiscent of early Genesis.  This song will chase you around the room at high speed for a while, then give you a chance to catch your breath and settle in for the night...

                      

Another walk across the calendar has ended as one more week falls into the abyss.  Falling Edge once again reminds me of the pleasure that spending time in the prog garden is; so much to choose from and so many tributaries to travel up, down, over, and through.  Complacency has no home for the prog minded here in the Concert Closet as a determination to bring something new usually leads to expanded horizons and a wider range of sound and performance.

Falling Edge is just one of the low under the radar bands doing great things here in the prog garden.  The search for all things prog has brought to light numerous bands and artists that challenge themselves with every new song, and every new entry hopes to find you waiting with anticipation...until next time...