Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Black Cat 6 "Scratching My Itch"

Socially distanced greetings fellow progheads!  As the worldwide pandemic continues and nations stay (at least partially) closed, The Closet Concert Arena continues to safely search out prog bands for your listening pleasure.

This week the journey brings me back to some familiar faces in new places as I check in with
Black Cat 6 and their debut release "Scratching My Itch."  This album was released on Halloween 2019; thinking it was time for some fun here in the Concert Closet I dug right in...


First cut to get the laser drop is "You're a Liar."  The song jumps in your face right out of the gate.  Hard driving guitar with some very solid drum work gets your adrenaline pumping...this should be an exciting week...

Top notes of Spock's Beard and Dreadnaught run rampant through the headphones and kick at your skull from all sides.  This is a band that enjoys playing and performing; you can feel the energy...as striking as a tornado funnel cloud breaking the horizon.

Next up is "Lose Your Way," another cut with a rough edge, but with the corners rounded just a bit.  A prog band that takes the eternal jam session approach to playing; you can almost hear additional performers joining the line-up as the music plays on.  Black Cat 6 has found a portal to the classic prog era of the 70's and they are squeezing all the life they can from it.  This song has a funk about it that reminds me of Joe Walsh in his James Gang days, but with a stronger ensemble.  The drum here lay a solid foundation and the guitar work leaps all over the room.

Liner Notes...like other bands Neil Citron is involved with, the focus is on the music and not so much the behind-the-scenes stuff.  Their home is the USA and they play like you would expect a hard hitting prog band from America to play--straight at you with no warning.  Somehow I don't think the name of the band or the  album was pulled randomly from a hat...

The band is a trio consisting of the aforementioned Neil Citron on guitar, keyboards, and vocals, Luke Fattore on drums, and Jon Pomplin on bass.  If you pick up top notes of BangTower you are quite astute; although Neil is the only member of both bands, the hard charging energy from both bands is unmistakable.

Neil is a Grammy winner, Luke an in-demand session drummer and producer, and Jon started Declassified Records, the label on which this album was recorded.  Individually accomplished, collectively occupying territory in the high energy section of the prog garden...


Last serving of the night is "Saying It Out Loud."  More of a ballad feel than the other songs I've listened to thus far, there is a sense of Seconds Before Landing in the air the way emotions drip from every note.  Don't be fooled though--the guitar still has that sting to it and the air is heavy with a brooding ardor...the canvas strokes are dark and heavy; Black Cat 6 can be quite the mood elevator...

This week I chose for your listening interlude "Black Cat," mainly for its heavy opening.  This one comes at you in a deceptive, creep-up-on-you kind of way; there are top notes of Cream shooting through the headphones. Everything about this song is heavy...it might not be metal but it sure as hell weighs a ton.  Black Cat 6 is another arena for Neil to just let loose, and Jon and Luke seem all in on the adventure.  This is a band for those who have been around the prog garden a few times and remember the fun they had taking that first journey.  Pour something with some weight behind it and sit back...




You can connect with the band and purchase their album on their website Blackcat6 and Bandcamp.
They also have Facebook and Twitter @BlackCat6band.  You've got time, stat awhile...


                  

So my fellow progheads, I hope Black Cat 6 made your quarantine a little more enjoyable and a lot more tolerable.  One of the things I enjoy about spending time in the prog garden is how big the umbrella is and how diverse the music is when traveling the different side roads in the genre.  Black Cat 6 isn't a throwback so much as a reflection of the past cast upon the future.  The music may be heavy and even dark at times, but the sun shines brightly on their section of the prog garden.

And once again the search for all things prog continues...until next week...   

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Circuline "Circulive Majestik"

Good evening once again fellow progheads!  Whether you're in quarantine, a forced lock down, or just plain staying at home for the foreseeable future, I hope you are virus-free, safe, and finding musical pleasure in the prog garden.

The search for all things prog continues despite the worldwide pandemic, and since the idea of seeing a live show is all but a fantasy until (at least) Autumn 2021, I thought now the perfect time to bring a "live show" to the Concert Closet.  So regardless as to whether I'm rubbing salt in a fresh wound or making the best of a difficult situation, welcome to the latest release from Circuline; Circulive Majestik."


Another band with a strong female lead vocalist; coincidence?  Perhaps not...
Once again my headphones are on and the first song to pierce my auditory canals is "Who I Am," with a strong keyboard intro that leads into a soft melodic flow that is reminiscent of Yes.  Lead vocals are not only strong they are shared, making for a bit of intrigue I simply cannot avoid...

Opening the show with "Who I Am" starts the journey with an introspective kick.  Right away you are thrust down a rabbit hole of wonder as the piano mesmerizes you.  The guitars and percussion pick up on that energy and push you farther along...and then darkness--save the lone candle burning a hole through the center of the canvas.  Those double lead vocals burst on the scene,  and yes it is extremely captivating.  There are aromatics of Supertramp floating through this cut, right down to the bone-chilling wind that blows through as the mood changes.  A touch of Camel comes through as well, filling the room with all sorts of energy bursts.  A great opening performance...

Next on the playlist is "Summit."  There is somewhat of a Moody Blues feel as the song opens; soft and genteel.  The guitar that leads you deeper into the song is smooth like the satin lining of a suede jacket.  The vocals wrap around that guitar like a scarf on a blustery day.  Top notes are Fairport Convention and Gentle Giant as the music fills the canvas with deep, rich hues.  Circuline has put together an album that reaches across the prog garden to satisfy many affluent tastes.

Liner Notes...Calling New York home, Circuline is a live action definition of what it means to be a band--the contributions of all being necessary to create the whole.  With Natalie Brown and Billy Spillane sharing lead vocal duties, Andrew Colyer on keyboards, Alek Darson on guitars, Matt Dorsey on bass, and Darin Bannon on drums, I am reminded of The Band in the sense that everyone makes multiple contributions to the entirety of the project...and it is an impressive ensemble.

Brought to life in 2014, Circuline is a "Mulligan Stew" of talent; two theatre quality lead vocalists, a keyboard player that attended Julliard, bass and guitar players that channel 70's prog at it finest, and a drummer who connects it all together.  Cinematic symphonic prog meets AOR and blows the roof off--without frivolous distractions.

Get to know Circuline at their website Circulinemusic and purchase their music at Bandcamp.  There is also Facebook and Twitter @CirculineMusic to stay connected and learn the latest the band has to offer.

The final spin this week is "Stay Alive."  The opening path the song leads you down is once again fraught with sounds coming at you from several directions brought together beautifully by Natalie's vocals. Keyboards and drums work together on this piece to underscore the guitar; so majestic throughout.  Circuline channels a bit of The Strawbs here; they truly pay homage to their cinematic/symphonic roots. 

For your listening pleasure I chose "Hollow."  I wanted you to get a taste of what this band is capable of; running the gambit from beautiful piano work to intricate keyboards, slick guitars to solid drums and percussion, and of course the dueling vocal stylings.  As fine tuned a live recording as anything in my current collection.  Sit back and enjoy... 


                     

So fellow progheads, I hope you enjoyed the "live" show from the prog garden this week.  Circuline is a band that connects on so many levels, bringing a sound to the Concert Closet that had me more than once checking the calendar to see if I time traveled back to the prog heydays of the 70's.

Now it's time to look ahead as the search for all things prog continues the journey...until next time...

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

The Far Meadow "Foreign Land"

Quarantine greetings fellow progheads!  Flattening the curve is certainly easier and more tolerable from inside the Concert Closet, so with mask and gloves at the ready let us foray deep into the prog garden and listen in with The Far Meadow on their latest release, "Foreign Land."



I have always been intrigued by bands--especially prog bands--with a strong female vocalist.  One would think the music lends itself to the sultry musings of a strong female voice, yet there seems to be so few in the genre.  Rather than lament that fact, let's enjoy those that call the prog garden home.  One again, headphones on...

Opening cut is "Travelogue" and as the curtain peels back slowly there are top notes of ELP spilling out.  Keyboards come at you subtly at first, then they explode all over the canvas...just like Keith would do.  The vocals are sandwiched between layers of keyboards and drums--and the lady can certainly hold her own.  The guitar works its way in and the vocals just continue to wind through the entire piece.  The music plays with you;  the symphonic roots The Far Meadow prides themselves on give way to a sultry ballad  at times...and the bass is reminiscent of Tony Levin.  This opening cut offers much; hopefully the band doesn't spend it all in one place...

Fear not--the second song I drop the laser on, "Mud," keeps the energy needle in the red.  The Gothic keyboards and upbeat tempo are strong with aromatics of Dreadnaught and perhaps a touch of Roxy Music to keep it interesting.  The drums are a solid foundation to this cut and everything fits like the proverbial glove.  The music is smooth as a silk necktie and cool as the zoot suit it's paired with...The Far Meadow
demonstrates the ability to make intelligent, well produced music and have fun while doing it.

Liner Notes...hailing from London, The Far Meadow is a quintet with Denis Warren on lead and rhythm guitar, Keith Buckman on bass, Eliot Minn on keyboards, Paul Bringloe on drums and percussion, and the lady behind those piercing vocals is Marguerita Alexandrou.  This is the third album in the band's catalog; the second on Bad Elephant Music.

The Far Meadow released their first album in 2012 and kept an upward trajectory.  With a sound that radiates across the prog garden from Yes to Rush to Gentle Giant, this is a band I would love to see perform live...curse you COVID-19 (and that darn trip across the Atlantic)...

You can learn more about the band at their website thefarmeadow and Facebook.  Feel free to give them a shout out on Twitter  @TheFarMeadow as well.  Of course purchasing the music is always a great way to support the artist, and you can do just that at Bandcamp.

One last selection to settle into; "Foreign Land."  Title cuts are telling to me because they shine a brighter light into the soul of the band.  In this case, I get a sense of crystals set on an antique table with lavender scented candles filling the room with a most soothing aroma.

Marguerita once again caresses you with her smooth vocals...and the tempo picks up a bit.  Not so much that the candles are blown out, but your blood is pulsing with a bit more oomph.  The song settles into a rather surprising groove as everyone lets their energy flow; you can feel it pumping through the headphones.  This is a "sit on the back of the sofa with a favorite beverage and the lights off" kind of moment, so excuse me while I fade to black...


For your own listening pleasure this week I chose "Sulis Rise," a captivating piece of music.  The drums are just enough to keep the entire piece flowing like a silk scarf in a soft breeze, the keyboards cutting through and all the while Marguerita once again crawls inside your head and wraps around your cranium like velvet.  Denis uses his guitar to splay the canvas with an array of color that bleeds from soft hues to bold flashes of brightness.  The Far Meadow takes you on quite the journey with each song...enjoy the ride... 

                  

So my fellow progheads, once again a fun week of hanging in the Concert Closet winds down.  The Far Meadow proved to be a bright light shining across the prog garden.  The music gives off a "feel good" vibe the genre needs needs a shot of every now and then...and who can resist vocals that smooth?

But alas, the search for all things prog continues on its never ending journey...until next time...

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Checking For Echo "The War is Never Won"

Welcome back to the Concert Closet fellow progheads!  I hope everyone is practicing social distancing and staying safe at home.  As the world continues to deal with the chaos and tragedy that is COVID-19, my objective is to bring you everything the prog garden has to offer from new and
low-under-the-radar prog bands and musicians--all you have to is log on and enjoy!  This week I catch up with Checking For Echo and their latest release, "The War is Never Won."


Released in March, "The War is Never Won" is a concept album--pretty much the standard for most new prog albums today.  Concept albums rarely deal with light-hearted subjects and this one is no exception.  War, its affects on those who served in battle, and why mankind seems to choose this option so often is the inspiration here.  I enjoy exploring concept albums not only for the music, but the story behind the curtain; the motivation to put pen to paper and music to disc.  Time once again to don a pair of headphones...

The album opens with a 16-minute piece called "The War Within."  The piano bleeds gently as the music begins to pour through your entire body.  As vocals begin to wrap around your ears you feel the melancholy mood the song is trying to evoke; the war within can truly be a harsher battle than that which your government sent you to fight.

But the message is far from being told in its entirety here--indeed the war has just begun.  The
opening tune leaps repeatedly back and forth from present to past, painting a picture for the listener of the dark and ugly underbelly of every war ever fought and how difficult the journey back from that pain really is...yes, this will be quite the introspective week...

Looking over the playlist I found an interesting title; "Imaginary Evidence."  Once again soft piano is the canvas, this time snippets of wartime radio and news messages float across the top, balanced with military "rat-a-tat-tat" drum precision.  This plays out like old movie footage; Checking For Echo is demonstrating a brilliant ability to look directly into the soul of the soldier and bring to life the emotions and feelings that torment those who "fought the good fight."  Was there justification for sending so many to inflict so much damage?  Can there ever be enough justification?  How does a soldier balance the act of killing on behalf of one's government with the fact that he/she took human life?  There are reflections of Seconds Before Landing in this entire album that I find striking...



Liner Notes...Checking For Echo is the brainchild of Jon Farley.  You may remember Jon as part of the duo known as Hollow Moon along with Darren Selesnow.  Darren did co-write and play guitar on "The War Within" and the credits list a plethora of additional people who helped Jon pull this entire thing off...but Checking For Echo is ultimately a one-man operation.

Jon resides in Moray, Scotland and has been wandering the prog garden for quite some time.  His work in Checking For Echo is abutted by the aforementioned Hollow Moon.  Jon is a multi-instrumentalist/songwriter playing every instrument and note you hear as well as writing all the
lyrics-- except for Darren's guitar and co-writing for "The War Within."

Jon refers to his work as cinematic prog and the images and visual spectacles his music evokes in the listener certainly qualify it as such.  There may not be a music "explosion" the likes of Circuline or Tangerine Dream, but Checking For Echo does find its way deep into your consciousness and  allow you to feel the music in a way only cinematic prog does.  Learn more about Checking For Echo on Facebook and purchase the music at Bandcamp.

My third foray into the heart of this album is "The Greatest Freedom."  The faint sounds of a helicopter fade quickly as piano and vocals rise up to come at you from what feels like another dimension.  The colors running softly down the canvas are the soft hues of hope and determination...inside the mind of a soldier refusing to give into the (seemingly endless) onslaught of mental and physical defeat.  Regardless of your feelings about war or the governments that start them, the view through the eye of a soldier who saw it all up close and personal adds a new dimension to the kaleidoscope through which we witness the world.

My choice for your listening pleasure is a bit different this time...a little taste of what to expect from the entire album.  I urge you to indulge your curiosity and let yourself feel (perhaps) equal parts uncomfortable and comforted...I believe Mr. Farley himself says it best; "The greatest freedom, it's often said, will come to us all when all else is dead."

                  

So thus the curtain falls on yet another beautiful performance from the Concert Closet.  Checking For Echo crawls inside your head and taps on the thinking part of your brain.  Being soothed and challenged at the same time isn't something many can pull off--so enjoy the rare treat.

Now it's time once again to take the journey in another direction as the search for all things prog continues on...until next time...

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Dreaming Madmen "Ashes of a Diary"

Hello again fellow progheads and thank you for making the return trip to The Closet Concert Arena!  The world may be in lock down, but the prog garden continues to bring forth new, intriguing, and exceptional music from a plethora of artists.  This week the search for all things prog traveled from Austin, TX to Lebanon and back again, checking out the intricate sounds of Dreaming Madmen and their debut album, "Ashes of a Diary."



"Ashes of a Diary" was released in September; a concept album dealing with raw human emotion.  Anyone who has read my blog knows this journey is right in my wheelhouse.  Before dropping laser to disc I get a sense that the canvas will be filled with all the colors of the emotional rainbow.  I think it's headphones time...

Starting right in with the opening cut, "Page One." The delicate rise of emotion fills my head space with a deliberate slowness.  The guitar methodically creeps into the corners of your mind and all at once a darkness as tangible as cobwebs in the attic wraps itself around your consciousness.  There are strong top notes of Pink Floyd running rampant throughout while aromatics of Dream Theater float on top like Angostura Bitters on a glass of scotch; not for the faint of heart...

Trepidation mixed with nervous giddiness fills the spirit as I wander down the album and discover "Enigma."  The band is  toying with me again...a dark solitude gets interrupted by strong guitar work lifted up by heavy drum work.  Dreaming Madmen hammer you with pulled punches; the keyboards ride a wave through the entire piece to cushion the blows.  True to the song's title, this song is an enigma...floating in between worlds that are combative and protective.  You feel a pull from both sides of the emotional spectrum as you fall into the abyss...

Liner Notes...Lebanese American brothers Mathew and Christopher Aboujaoude  are originally from Deir El Harf, Lebanon, but also call Austin, TX home.  Dreaming Madmen is comprised mainly of said brothers; Mathew handles guitars, keyboards, synthesizers while Christopher has bass and keyboard solos on select cuts nailed down, and the duo shares vocal duties.  Filling out the band on their debut release is Ian Geyer on drums and percussion, Rohan Sharma playing lead synthesizers on select cuts, and Caelin Tralongo laying down the vocals for the song, "Your Possesor."

You can learn more about Dreaming Madmen at their website DreamingMadmen and Facebook.
To dig a bit deeper, tag them on Twitter@DreamingMadmen.  And of course you can purchase the band's music at bandcamp and applemusic.

My final song for review this week is "Your Possessor."  Sounds come slowly from the darkness, rising gently as they caress your mind.  Delicate vocals are entwined with guitar that penetrates your spirit while drums give the song a driving force that cuts through that emotional curtain between heart and head.

Dreaming Madmen bring human frailty to the forefront with this album without condemning the main character of the story.  The lens through which a man's life is viewed is a kaleidoscope of human emotion...sadness for what might have been; regret for moments both lived and lost; love, anger, fear, and perhaps the most human emotion of all--jealousy.  Mathew and Christopher take the listener on a roller coaster that runs the gambit of emotion ultimately ending where it began...the heart of a humble man.

Listen to the clip below, "Behind My Wall" and you will get a sense of how deep Dreaming Madmen are able to go.  The music fills the canvas with such an array of mood and emotion you will find yourself challenged to keep up.  There are top notes of Porcupine Tree and Nad Sylvan running through the veins of this song...and just when you think the journey is through, you find yourself once more falling into that intoxicating abyss...


                     

There you go my fellow progheads, another amazing debut for the Closet Concert Arena.  Dreaming Madmen venture inside your mind in order to find the path to your soul.  The music is deep and rich; mesmerizing you could say.  Plunging into the spirit of a life lived--who doesn't wrestle with the "what ifs" life manages to throw at you?

The search for all things prog continues to roam the prog garden, hoping to find more music like this...captivating, emotional, and overflowing with the sorrow and joy that makes us all human.  So the journey continues...until next time...

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Mika Luoto "Seventh Wonder"

Hello once again fellow progheads!  So much happening in the prog garden as 2020 continues to unfold, and I will continue bringing it to you from the Concert Closet one artist at a time.  This week the search for all things prog packed some extra hand sanitizer and surgical masks for an extended flight to Finland to check in with Mika Luoto,  a friend I have not followed up with in way too long...

Mika released his latest album, "Seventh Wonder," in October.  Mika has been playing music almost as long as he has been breathing and his catalog is fairly extensive.  Did I mention he also plays every instrument and every note you hear?  This time around the turntable Mika seems to be in a funky jazz groove, so let's settle into a comfortable leather chair and apply the headphones...

The album opens with "Tottoroo" and flows into "Buck is Duck" as smooth as a single malt over ice.  In fact this entire album is as smooth as a snort of Johnny Walker Blue; Mika absolutely found his praxis and fills the headphones with Finnish prog bliss.

Moving further down the track list I discover a tune called "Country Rock Guitar Stuff."  This time  Mika plays as if he's a Roy Clark/Mark Knopfler hybrid; the sultry sounds of a country bar channeled through the AOR styles of an after hours nightclub jam session.

Liner Notes...for those who missed my first review of Mika Luoto way back in 2016, Mika hails from Oulainen, Finland.  He picked up a guitar when he was a teenager and never looked back.  His music catalog runs deep; 14 releases deep to be exact.  He also records music as his alter ego under the name Musarra...a little bit darker and a heavier edged prog metal.  Mika has performed live in large halls, small clubs, and a lot of venues in between.  Today he seems to enjoy doing his own thing while hanging out in his own section of the prog garden.


Mika plays every note and every instrument you hear--he truly is a one man band.  Not the only one I follow, but they seem be a dying breed.  I for one, am glad they still exist; check out Mika's music and you will be too.  You will find "Seventh Wonder" and his other 13 releases at
Mika Luoto BandcampMika can also be found on Facebook and Twitter @mikaluoto1.

One last song to peel back the curtain on; "What's in That Bag."  This cut is bit harder than others on the album, although the funk, blended with a few top notes of Dreadnaught,  is alive and well.  Mika might have channeled a bit of Musarra on this cut...nothing wrong with that.

OK; time for the ear candy..."Autumn Vibes."  I chose this song because Mika is deep into that late night jazz mood I spoke about earlier.  I pick up top notes of Les Dudek and Al DiMeola running through my auditory canals; Mika Luoto paints a vivid picture with that guitar.  I get aromatics of Gaillion and the Pat Metheny Group cursing through this album as well; enjoy...


                        

So fellow progheads, another entry for the prog garden sprouting up in the jazz section.  Mika Luoto has been traversing the prog garden for quite some time.  While I listen to much of his catalog, I am impressed with his drive and ambition; his determination to bring a new sound to every album he releases.  The search for all things prog has found a "sleeper" in the midst; hopefully that will change with this release.

Now of course it's time to continue the journey and take the search for all things prog on to new adventures...until next time...

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Seconds Before Landing "Cosmonaut"

Happy New Year fellow progheads!  The Closet Concert Arena has finally made its 2020 debut. Apologies for the delay as the Concert Closet changed zip codes; already the prog garden is at flood stage with new, amazing, and absolutely stunning music. 

Since this is my first post of the new year I wanted it to be something special.  Recently I've been in touch with John Crispino, the brains and insightful mind behind the sounds of Seconds Before Landing.  Whenever John has a new album out I am filled with the same excitement a child has on Christmas morning; I know it will be a unique collection of music that John has immersed himself in from start to finish.  On a par with Scarlet INside, Seconds Before Landing is music that I love to get lost in knowing the journey I am about to undertake will be not only like no other I've taken before, it will differ slightly each time I travel the path.  So I bring you "Cosmonaut," the latest independent release from Seconds Before Landing.




This is a concept album...if you're familiar with Seconds Before Landing and John Crispino at all this comes as no surprise.  John is a master at creating a story, painting a most vivid picture with music and song...breathing life into what would otherwise be a two dimensional illustration.  This the tale of Russian cosmonauts Yuri Gagarin and Vladimir Komarov...and so we begin...

The opening "Weightless" bleeds right into "Life."  The technical sounds of an engineering room give way to a softer mood...a gentler tone.  Female vocals/spoken words spill through the headphones as a young wife tells her husband she has given him a son...and the saga begins.  You are then totally engrossed in the soft sounds of life, much like the opening of the Yes classic "Close to the Edge."  The guitar work is mesmerizing; close your eyes and be swept away on a journey through time and space... Seconds Before Landing pulls you in as few others can.


Moving along I discover more inspirational visions poring forth from the headphones; "My Best Friend" and "March Into Klushino."  John truly has a gift when composing an album; his ability to delve so deep into the story he's telling makes you feel as though you're right there with him.  As these two pieces give the back story to the relationship of Yuri and his brother Boris, what come through the headphones is so much more than music--the story truly is coming to life...

Liner Notes...Although Seconds Before Landing has many hands and faces behind the microphone, the band truly begins and ends with John Crispino.  He is so much more than simply the man behind the music and his music is so much more than simply notes played  together.  There are a few members of the prog garden I categorize as artist first and then musician; John is a strong representative of that select group.

Despite taking on the role of composer and vocalist, playing drums and synthesizers, John would be the first to say his work would not be nearly as good without the contributions of others.  He has assembled an impressive group; two-time Grammy winner and Pink Floyd engineer Andy Jackson mastered the album.  Musicians include Eric Maldonado, Steve Schuffert, and Rick Witkowski on guitars; J.D. Garrison and Guy Bar Tor on bass; Jamie Peck on piano and sax; and Vanessa Campagna does all the female vocals.  But they aren't the life source of Seconds Before Landing--John Crispino is, and it's his vision being realized as the sound pours through your headphones.
                                                                                                                                                             
It is difficult to do a concept album such as this justice by hopping around and reviewing intermittent songs, yet I find myself doing exactly that.  The album moves in a timeline and I am making but a humble attempt to present that to you.  This next song, "One Minute to Launch," reminds me of Pink Floyd in their "Atomic Heart Mother" and "Meddle" days...interludes that connect the songs to each other, giving the canvas a third dimension which allows the listener to ride along on an incredible journey.

The final song to grace the headphones this evening is "Oh How I Miss You."  Vanessa is stunning as she gives the perspective of Komarov's  grieving widow.  Her voice pierces the membrane in your eardrum and flows directly to your heart...you can almost see her sitting in a chair wearing one of Vladimir's favorite shirts, staring into the void that took the love of her life.

If you haven't already, you can follow Seconds Before Landing at Seconds Before Landing and also on Facebook and Twitter @SBLOfficial.  You can purchase the album at SBL Bandcamp

I offer you but a teaser this week...one minute plus that sets the tone for what you will find when you make the purchase.  The air is solemn and dark...the mood foreboding.  Modern day prog has a classic storyteller you will want to hear again and again. 


                   

I put Seconds Before Landing in a category with modern day prog artists Scarlet INsideDeep Energy Orchestra, and even Kaprekar's Constant and Dreadnaught.  Not because they share similarities in sound, tempo, or mood--but because they choose to stand alone.  Direct comparisons are difficult despite the fact that the musicians have been in several bands prior to joining this latest group.  Indeed every song, every lyric, even every note is unique unto itself.  John's ability to leave all of his previous musical accomplishment at the door prior to entering the studio and create something solely for itself to stand alone among the masses is truly remarkable.

I hope the wait was worth it fellow progheads!  Seconds Before Landing can be an acquired taste, but well worth the investment.  With so much more on the horizon I feel a sense of urgency to continue the journey...so the search for all things prog continues...until next time...